A case that reads "MOON ROCK: A piece of the lunar meteorite Dar al Gani 400".
"The meteorite fragment enclosed with a weight of 11mg is an authentic moon rock according to the standards of the Meteoritical Society, London. The fragment was part of a 1.425 kg lunar meteorite that was found in Libya on March 10th, 1998."
A case that reads "MOON ROCK: A piece of the lunar meteorite Dar al Gani 400".
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, "The meteorite fragment enclosed with a weight of 11mg is an authentic moon rock according to the standards of the Meteoritical Society, London. The fragment was part of a 1.425 kg lunar meteorite that was found in Libya on March 10th, 1998."
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Moon Rock

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We have 2 Moon Rocks for you to choose from. 

This 11 mg  Moon Rock is a lunar meteorite fragment that is guaranteed to be authentic by the International Meteorite Collectors Association and the standards of the Meteoritical Society of London.

Unlike the moon rock specimens brought back by Apollo astronauts, which are government property, it is legal to own this specimen.

The lunar surface is constantly bombarded by meteorites.  With no atmosphere and little gravity, impacts of these meteorites eject rock from the lunar surface into space.  The force of the earth's  gravity captures these rocks causing them to fall toward earth as meteorites.  When a meteorite is suspected of having a lunar origin it becomes a matter for scientific testing.  Scientists and researchers throughout the world examine the meteorites and compare them to known samples collected on the Apollo missions.  Similarities of the composition of gases and isotopes of this specimen and the Apollo specimens confirm the lunar origin.

The first lunar meteorites were discovered in Antarctica in 1982.  Since then more have been discovered and identified in the deserts of northwest Africa and Oman.

These moon rocks are from the Dar Al Gani 400 lunar meteorite which was found March 1998 in Libya in the Sahara Desert.  It weiged 1425 grams (about 3.1 lbs.).  It was one of the largest lunar meteorites of the time.  Much of the original identification and classification work was done at the Max Planck Institute in Mainz, Germany.

This specimen is a small fragment of the original meteorite.